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The 2021 International Summer School is cancelled and postponed to 2022

Photo by: Eva Therese Jenssen/UNIS

 

It is with a heavy heart that the Academy Board has decided to cancel the NVP International Summer School 2021 and postpone to summer 2022.

After cancelling the 2020 International Summer School due to Covid-19, the Academy planned to arrange a physical International Summer School on Svalbard during the autumn/winter of 2021. For a long time we hoped to be able to arrange the 2021 Summer School, but unfortunately, we must cancel due to implications of Covid-19.

All students accepted to the 2020 and 2021 summer schools, will be offered to attend the 2022 Summer School that will be arranged in Longyearbyen, Svalbard. In late 2021 or early 2022 we will contact all students regarding dates for the 2022 Summer School. The 2022 Summer School will most likely be arranged in June 2022.

The Board of directors and the organizing committee have decided to keep the program and structure of the three years’ project «The Global Arctic». This means that the program will be the same, with minor changes, and moves forward in time for 2022‐2024.

Whether the Academy will open for new applications for the 2022 Summer School has not been decided. More information will follow in early 2022.

The Board of Directors and the organizing committee are sincerely sorry that we yet again are in a position where we must postpone the International Summer School due to the Covid-19 situation.

Questions?

Please do not hesitate to contact us on post@polar-academy.com if you have questions.

Decision regarding the 2021 International Summer School

Photo by: Eva Therese Jenssen/UNIS

Decision regarding the 2021 International Summer School

As previously informed, The Norwegian Scientific Academy for Polar Research decided to cancel the 2020 International Summer School and postpone to 2021 due to the global outbreak of Covid-19.

Unfortunately, the Covid-19 situation is still changing rapidly, and the global situation is highly uncertain. Thus, the Norwegian Scientific Academy for Polar Research has decided to not arrange the 2021 International Summer School during the summer months of 2021.

The Academy has considered arranging the summer school digitally, but decided not to do this. Experiencing Svalbard and field activity are two key components in our summer school, as well as we believe that meeting physically is an important ground stone for the interdisciplinary joint peer reviewed article that the students will publish as a result from the work at the summer school.

Moving forward, the Academy will plan for a physical International Summer School on Svalbard during the autumn/winter of 2021.

All qualified students from 2020 have been kept in the Academy’s records and contacted in February 2021, and will be contacted again as soon as new dates for the 2021 International Summer School have been decided. A decision is expected in mid-May 2021.

Whether the committee will open for new applications for the 2021 Summer School has not been decided.

The Board of Directors and the organizing committee are sincerely sorry that we yet again are in a position where we must postpone the International Summer School due to the Covid-19 situation.

Questions?

Please do not hesitate to contact us on post@polar-academy.com if you have questions.

Update – NVP International Summer School 2021

Due to the global outbreak of coronavirus (COVID-19), The Norwegian Scientific Academy for Polar Research decided to postpone the 2020 International Summer School until 2021. Dates for the 2021 Summer School has not yet been decided.

Qualified applicants from 2020 has been kept in the Academy’s records and will be contacted as soon as new dates for the 2021 Summer School has been decided.

Whether the committee will open for new applications for the 2021 Summer School has not been decided.

More information about the 2021 Summer School will be published on the Academy’s web site in February 2021.

Current information about the International Summer School 2021 can be seen here.

NVP International Summer school 2020 – Postponed until 2021

During the last days, there has been rapid development in the situation regarding the Coronavirus. Health and safety is of the highest priority all around the world.

Due to the global outbreak of novel coronavirus (COVID-19), The Norwegian Scientific Academy for Polar Research has decided to cancel the 2020 International Summer School and postponed to next year (June 2021).

We have received 61 applications from candidates from 25 different countries and the uncertainty around the global situation would make difficult to move forward to organize the participation of the selected candidates.

The NVP International Summer School is organized in cooperation with UNIS – The University Centre in Svalbard and we follow UNIS’ contingency plans for the Coronavirus (COVID-19) based on the advisories from the Norwegian Institute of Public Health, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and local authorities in Longyearbyen.

The committee will still move forward and review all applications, those who are considered as qualified will receive an email in a couple of weeks’ time where we will suggest to keep an open application for next year and we will keep them informed about the plans moving forward. This doesn’t mean that you will be admitted but that we would like to keep your application in our files, and you will receive regular information from the Academy regarding the Summer School program. At a later stage this year, you will be asked if you want to keep your application active or not. If you do not hear form us by the end of this month, this means your application was not qualified for participation.

In these difficult times, we would like to encourage you to follow the recommendations you receive from your local authorities to keep you and those around you healthy.

Cruising the marginal ice zone: climate change and Arctic tourism

This article is the final result of the “The Arctic and the marginal ice zone (MIZ): Interdisciplinary research, management, practices and policy developments” summer school, held in Longyearbyen, Svalbard, in August 2017, organized by the Norwegian Scientific Academy for Polar Research (NVP), in cooperation with the University Centre in Svalbard (UNIS), UiT – the Arctic University of Norway, the Nord University, the Norwegian Polar Institute (NPI), Akvaplan-niva, the Nansen Environmental and Remote Sensing Center (NERSC), the Nansen Scientific Society and the Russian Geographical Society (RGS) . It brought together Master and PhD students, as well as postdocs, from all over Europe, Russia and Canada with their respective expertise. With contents and discussions in a wide range of disciplines, the summer school was a multi- and cross-disciplinary thematic approach to meet challenges and opportunities related to governance of the Arctic Ocean’s marginal ice zone. This interdisciplinary approach brought together academics from distinct backgrounds to publish this article in the Polar Geography journal, combining tourism studies, oceanography, biology, ICT and governance. The conjugation of multiple academic disciplines is becoming imperative in understanding the future of the Arctic environment and its associated industries under the impact of climate change. More so, it presents the ideal opportunity to open dialogue between science, policy and industry, to encourage the sustainable development of this unique and changing region.

The article explores links between the MIZ, climate change and the cruise tourism industry. The consequences of climate change are particularly evident in the Arctic. In recent years, we have witnessed significant changes and reductions in Arctic sea ice distribution and volume. Seized as an opportunity, plans are being made for expansion of economic activities such as shipping, fisheries, oil and gas extraction, deep-sea mining and of course tourism. The effects of climate change are leading to pronounced physical and ecological changes in the Arctic MIZ. These are not only of concern for the research community but also for the tourism industry dependent on this unique marine ecosystem. Tourists increasingly become aware that the Arctic as we know it today may disappear due to several environmental threats, and want to visit the region before it becomes irrevocably changed. However, ‘last-chance tourism’ in this region faces several challenges. The lack of infrastructure and appropriate search and rescue policies are examples of existing issues in such a remote location. Additionally, tourism itself may further amplify the physical and ecological changes in the Arctic region.

Cruise tourism in the MIZ, is highly dependent on its unique environment, with the development of nature-based activities, such as wildlife safaris and natural sightseeing tours. In other words, the tourism industry is highly susceptible to the current effects of climate change in the Arctic, and the changes this is causing in the MIZ. The article explores the physical and biological parameters of the MIZ, how climate change is affecting them and how it impacts the cruise tourism industry. As a result, cruise liners will have to venture deeper in the MIZ and into potentially more remote locations, leading to safety and navigational concerns. In addition to this and the impacts on climate change, this study also acknowledges the lack of international measures for providing cross-sector marine protected areas and think beyond a single commercial activity or industry, protecting the Arctic and achieving a long term solution.

The full article can be read on-line here or in PDF format in our site

David Palma.

Alix Varnajot.

NVP International Summer School 2020

During the last board meeting, it was decided that the academy will move forward with the organization of the NVP’s International Summer School 2020. The board has named a Committee integrated by: Willy Østreng, Anton G. Kjelaas, Lars Otto Reiersen and Bjørn Kaltenborn.

More information will be published at a later stage once the planning work starts after the summer.

NVP Summer School – Commentary paper by Ilker Basaran

Missing the Obvious in Arctic Shipping Regulations: A Maritime Lawyer’s Observation from Svalbard

Ilker K. Basaran

As a participant to the interdisciplinary Ph.D. and Post-Doc summer school organized by the Norwegian Scientific Academy for Polar Research (NVP), I visited Svalbard this August (2017) and spent 10 busy days attending more than 50 lectures and presentations, talking to experts from all over the world, and finally exploring the place.

Here is my observation as a maritime lawyer.